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French Hospital Opens Wine Bar for Patients

French Hospital Opens Wine Bar for Patients


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A French hospital has opened a wine bar to cheer up patients

Wikimedia/DimiTalen

A French hospital is opening an on-site wine bar to improve the lives of terminally ill patients.

Terminally ill patients deserve a glass of wine as much as anybody, and a hospital in France has decided to make that happen by opening up a new on-site wine bar that will offer “medically supervised” wine tastings.

According to The Local, the new wine bar will open at the palliative care center at the Clermont-Ferrand hospital in Puy-de-Dôme in southern France. The wine bar will be the first such facility in France, and will be open to the hospital’s patients as well as their friends and relatives.

“A situation can be palliative for several weeks or even several months and it’s because life is so precious and real until the end that we decided to cultivate all that is fine and good,” said Dr. Virginie Guastella. “It’s a way of rethinking the care of others, taking into account their feelings and emotions that make them a human being.”

The wine bar will be stocked with fine wines, Champagne, and whiskey. The hospital says it hopes access to the wine bar will help brighten the lives of terminally ill patients and allow them to enjoy themselves a bit in their final days.


French hospital to open wine bar for terminally ill patients

A French hospital is to open a wine bar for terminally ill patients in an unprecedented but characteristically Gallic way to improve their quality of life.

Patients at the Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital in central France will be able to take part in "medically supervised wine-tasting" sessions.

They will be allowed to invite friends or family over for a drink.

Dr Virginie Guastella came up with the idea because she believes that patients "are entitled to enjoy" their last days.

Patients enthusiastically supported the plan, which has been approved by the authorities. The bar will open in September in the hospital's Palliative Care Centre.

"Why should we deprive people reaching the end of their lives of the traditional flavours of our land?" Dr Guastella said. The bar will stock a range of wines donated by local people. It will also serve whisky and champagne.

If the bar proves successful, doctors at Clermont-Ferrand hope the idea will be taken up by other hospitals in France.

Hospital staff will receive special training from a social anthropologist in dealing with patients who come to the bar.

The French generally cling to the belief that two glasses of a wine a day are beneficial for health, although recent studies have called the notion into question.

Research published in the journal of the American Medical Association two months ago indicated that antioxidants in red wine did not help people to live longer or reduce the risk of cancer or heart disease.

In a sign of changing attitudes to drinking, the French government ruled earlier this month that companies could ban wine from workplaces.

Previously, managers were only allowed to ban employees from bringing spirits to work.


French hospital plans wine bar to cheer patients' last days

The French have long been famed for their unshakeable belief in the health benefits of a glass of wine.

Now, one French hospital plans to take things a step further by opening a wine bar aimed at improving the quality of life of terminally-ill patients.

The bar at Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital in central France will open in September.

It will be housed in the hospital's palliative care centre and patients will be able to invite friends and family to share a drink with them.

The first of its kind in France, the bar would "cheer up the difficult day-to-day existence of patients," head of the centre Virginie Guastella told AFP.

"The aim is to 're-humanise' patients by improving the quality of their day-to-day existence and also by giving them the pleasure of being able to offer and receive," she said.

The bar would also allow families facing bereavement to "create moments of conviviality" despite being in a hospital environment, she added.

"It's a little detail but it can make all the difference."

Staff at the hospital will receive special training from a social anthropologist on how to handle patients who come to the bar.


French Hospital Will Open a Wine Bar

The great French scientist Louis Pasteur said, "Wine is the most healthful and most hygienic of beverages." That may not be current medical science, but the French have taken it to heart. A hospital in south central France plans to open an in-house bar for wine tasting by patients in palliative care. The Local reports:

Sipping wine may not be a traditional method of treatment for patients who are terminally ill but according to Dr Virginie Guastella, the head of the hospital unit who proposed the idea, it can help them and their loved ones to relax and converse.

&ldquoA situation can be palliative for several weeks or even several months and it&rsquos because life is so precious and real until the end that we decided to cultivate all that is fine and good,&rdquo Dr Guastella told The Local.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a way of rethinking the care of others, taking into account their feelings and emotions that make them a human being.&rdquo

The wine bar project was launched, she said, "in an attempt to restore longing, taste, desire and even pleasure.&rdquo


Hospital Opens Wine Bar to Cheer Up Terminally Ill Patients

A French hospital will become the first in the world to open up a wine bar in a bid to cheer up terminally ill patients in their final dying days.

Top doctors at Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital believe a few drinks with friends and family could dramatically enhance their quality of life.

The bar will be based in the palliative care centre, where staff will be trained in how best to deal with partying patients.

Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital Center said in statement the terminally ill will be allowed to enjoy a ‘medically supervised’ glass or two with their families.

The centre’s head, Dr. Virginie Guastella, said terminally ill patients have the right to enjoy themselves too.

He said: “Why should we refuse the charms of the soil to those at the end of their lives? Nothing justifies such an prohibition.

“Medically supervised tastings will help brighten what is often a difficult daily life.”


French hospital to open wine bar to cheer up terminally ill

PARIS (Reuters) - A hospital in the French city of Clermont-Ferrand is to open a wine bar where terminally ill patients will be able to enjoy a “medically-supervised” glass or two with their families.

“Why should we refuse the charms of the soil to those at the end of their lives? Nothing justifies such an prohibition,” the Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital Center said in statement.

The center’s head, Dr. Virginie Guastella, said terminally ill patients had the right to “enjoy themselves”.

The bar will be the first in France to offer such a facility for patients and their families. Staff will be specially trained before it opens in the hospital’s palliative care center in September.

“Medically supervised tastings will help brighten what is often a difficult daily life,” the hospital said.

Although some researchers have long held that an antioxidant found in red wine is good for the heart, some recent research has determined that wine’s health benefits are exaggerated.


French hospital to open wine bar for terminally ill patients

A French hospital has plans to open a wine bar for its terminally ill patients in a bid to help them improve their quality of life, offering them a chance to experience moments "of sharing and conviviality”.

Aside from hosting “medically supervised” wine tastings, the bar will also serve up whisky and champagne provided by sponsors and through partnerships.

The bar, which will be located at the palliative care centre of the Clermont-Ferrand hospital in southwestern France, is scheduled to open its doors in September, a statement from the hospital said.

The head of the unit that proposed the idea, Dr. Virginie Guastella, said she came up with the plan because she felt that terminally ill patients should “have the right to enjoy themselves”.

“It’s a way of rethinking the care of others, taking into account the feelings and emotions that make them a human being,” Guastella told the Local, a Paris-based news site.

The wine bar project was launched "in an attempt to restore longing, taste, desire and even pleasure” to patients who are coming to the end of their lives, she added.

The hospital said that the bar will also provide patients with “moments of sharing and conviviality” at a time when they need it the most.

“A medically supervised wine tasting will help brighten what is often a very difficult period of day-to-day life," it said.

“Why should people nearing the end of their lives be deprived of the flavours of our land?”

Patients will also be allowed to invite friends and family for a drink.

Hospital staff will receive special training from a social anthropologist on how to manage the new practice.

The wine bar has won the support of both patients and authorities, and will be the first of its kind in France, the hospital said.

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French hospital to open wine bar to cheer up terminally ill

PARIS (Reuters) - A hospital in the French city of Clermont-Ferrand is to open a wine bar where terminally ill patients will be able to enjoy a "medically-supervised" glass or two with their families. "Why should we refuse the charms of the soil to those at the end of their lives? Nothing justifies such an prohibition," the Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital Center said in statement. The center's head, Dr. Virginie Guastella, said terminally ill patients had the right to "enjoy themselves". The bar will be the first in France to offer such a facility for patients and their families. Staff will be specially trained before it opens in the hospital's palliative care center in September. "Medically supervised tastings will help brighten what is often a difficult daily life," the hospital said. Although some researchers have long held that an antioxidant found in red wine is good for the heart, some recent research has determined that wine's health benefits are exaggerated. (Reporting By Alexandria Sage, Editing by Angus MacSwan)

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Rose Bistro and Champagne Bar Hopes to Bring Some Parisian Cafe Culture to Midtown

Rose Bistro and Champagne Bar opens this fall at Atlantic Station in Midtown.

Taking cues from the cafes and wine bars of Paris, Rose Bistro and Champagne Bar will feature a raw bar and serve a mix of French and Southern dishes on the menu, like escargots bourguignon, steak frites, and shrimp and grits, paired with a lengthy list of wines and champagne and wine-based cocktails and punches.

“When I first visited Atlantic Station five years ago, I felt a sense of ‘joie de vivre’ or ‘joy of living’,” founder and general manager Sam Djomo Jr. says in a press release. “The storefronts and bustling streets at Atlantic Station reminded me of my home in Paris.”

Southern diner Bantam + Biddy opened earlier this month at Atlantic Station, replacing chicken restaurant Chick-a-Biddy on 19th Street at the development. Both restaurants are owned by chef Shaun Doty. Azotea Cantina and Toscano Ristorante Italian restaurant also open later this year.

Thai and Japanese restaurant SriThai Kitchen and Sushi opened last summer at Atlantic Station, followed by a fourth location of Atlanta-based restaurant Hobnob Neighborhood Tavern this spring. Over the last three years, Gyu-Kaku Japanese BBQ, Indian fast-casual restaurant NaanStop, bowling chain Bowlero, and Atlanta-based Vietnamese restaurant chain Pho 24 have all opened at the development flanking 17th Street in Midtown.


French restaurant & wine bar Aquitaine opens along Church St. after delay

French bistro and wine bar Aquitaine has opened at 216 Church St. after a months-long delay due to shelter-in-place restrictions. Aquitaine's first day of business was on Election Day Tuesday, November 3.

Last December Aquitaine announced it was closing its restaurant at the Crocker Galleria (175 Sutter St.) in the Financial District and moving to Church and Market. However, those plans were put on pause after shelter-in-place restrictions went into effect March 17.

Hoodline readers will recall 216 Church St. had been the former home of Crepevine, which closed in 2017 after 18 years in business.

Aquitaine's outdoor dining area. | Photo: Steven Bracco/Hoodline

Aquitaine co-owner Andrew Fidelman tells Hoodline that he along with co-owners chef Laurent Manrique and Chris Condy had been preparing to open since October.

"It feels good to be open," said Fidelman. "We've been received really well and gotten a lot of positive vibes from the neighborhood."

Fidelman says that he and chef Manrique are longtime friends who previously worked together at Aqua (252 California St.) before opening Aquitaine in 2013 with Chris Condy.

"Aquitaine is a casual, comfortable place where you can drink good wine and eat good food," said Fidelman. The trio also owns FiDi wine bar Blanc et Rouge (2 Embarcadero Center).

Fidelman tells Hoodline they were waiting to open Aquitaine until indoor dining was allowed. With current restrictions at 25% capacity, Aquitaine can accommodate approximately 12-13 diners indoors.

Aquitaine also has an outdoor dining Shared Spaces Platform which they created by repurposing the plywood that had been covering the restaurant's windows.

Aquitaine's menu. | Photo: Steven Bracco/Hoodline

Fidelman tells Hoodline customers can expect the menu to include highlights of the best dishes from over the years. Menu highlights include moules marmandes ($19), duck Reuben ($17), escantoun landais (a rosemary polenta with mushrooms and Pyranees cheese, $16), prawn tartine ($14), and a 24 oz ribeye for two ($50).

Fidelman says that Aquitaine decided to move to the new location after being approached by Veritas Investments' Justine Shoemaker, who owns the property.

"Our old place was a lot of dark wood and fewer windows, this is a lot of light with a ton of windows," said Fidelman about the new location.

Aquitaine is also currently using the former Church St. Flower (212 Church) space as storage. Depending on how the business progresses, Fidelman says they may consider using the space for private dining, or as a wine retail store.

"I lived two blocks from there from about 2003 to 2010 and spent a lot of time on Church and Market," said Fidelman. "I used to go to Sparky's, Crepevine, and Warakubune."

"We love the area, it's so vibrant," said Fidelman.

Aquitaine's awning from its location in the Crocker Galleria at 175 Sutter St. | Photo: Steven Bracco/Hoodline

When customers walk inside they will immediately be greeted by Aquitaine's awning from its Crocker Galleria location. "We felt like it fit there and looked nice inside," said Fidelman about the awning.

In the future, Fidelman says the area will become a semi-private dining area called 'La Cave' (the cave).

Looking towards the future Fidelman plans on hosting a Cassoulet Saturday dining event. Fidelman explained cassoulet is a traditional southwest French duck confit with white beans and sausage. "It's a rich, hardy dish," said Fidelman. Brunch is also planned down the road as the restaurant becomes more established.

With Aquitaine's opening, Il Casaro across the street, and the eventual reopening of Pilsner Inn, Fidelman hopes they can create a positive vibe along the closed section of Church Street. "Something similar to Belden Alley," said Fidelman referencing the longtime FiDi outdoor dining alley.

Aquitaine's opening fills one of many vacancies along a long-darkened section of Church Street.

Prior to Aquitaine's opening, 216 Church St. had previously been leased in January 2019 to Mark White, who announced plans to open Gramercy Park Brasserie & Wine Bar there.

Ultimately Gramercy Park never opened after White's restaurant across the street, Cook Shoppe (215 Church St.), closed in August 2019 in the wake of an investigation by the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control for serving alcohol without a license.

Neighborhood bar Pilsner Inn remains closed. | Photo: Steven Bracco/Hoodline

The 200 block of Church currently has six vacant storefronts including 213 Church, 215 Church (Cook Shoppe), 227 Church (Aardvark Books), 253 Church (Miyabi Sushi), 268 Church (Underglass Custom Framing), and 242 Church St. (Sparky's Diner).

Neighborhood bar Pilsner Inn (225 Church) remains closed and has not announced a reopening date.

Aquitaine is currently open Tuesday through Saturday from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Happy hour is Tuesday through Saturday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. And the restaurant is currently offering 30% off wine to-go.

Thanks to Hoodline tipster Christopher V.! If you've seen something new (or closing) in the neighborhood, text your tips and photos to (415) 200-3233, or email [email protected] If we use your info in a story, we'll give you credit.