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8 of the Worst Airlines for Food (Slideshow)

8 of the Worst Airlines for Food (Slideshow)


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These 8 airlines offer no real food, or food so bad you’ll wish you never ordered it

Shutterstock/Chris Parypa Photography

With Cheez-Its, Craisins, PopCorners, Terra chips, and other assorted bag and bar treats, JetBlue’s snack game is certainly on-point, but their meal selections will leave many customers disappointed. They serve a grilled chicken & brie sandwich, sirloin sandwich, spicy soba & Korean-style chicken plate, cheese plate, kale salad, and Chobani yogurt — but only if you’re flying from New York, Boston, or Fort Lauderdale to a handful of other airports. Everyone else will just have to settle for watching the Food Network on their headrest TVs.

Some of JetBlue’s food probably came from its Urban Farm outside JFK Airport. Click here for more details.

#8 JetBlue

Shutterstock/Chris Parypa Photography

With Cheez-Its, Craisins, PopCorners, Terra chips, and other assorted bag and bar treats, JetBlue’s snack game is certainly on-point, but their meal selections will leave many customers disappointed. Click here for more details.

#6 Frontier Airlines

Frontier Airlines offers no meals and their snack selection is limited to only Chex Mix, M&Ms, beef jerky, Pringles, gummy bears, Rice Krispies treats, and trail mix. Yikes. It’s like looking into the kitchen cabinets of a frat house. However, the booze selection isn’t bad, as in addition to alcoholic drinks such as Jack Daniel’s, Dewars, Tanqueray, Woodbridge wine, Heineken, and Coors Light, they also feature craft brews from Fat Tire and Oskar Blues, as well as Infinite Monkey hard cider. So I guess it really is like a frat house.

Frontier still has a lot of catching up to do on the beer front if they want to keep up with KLM, which just started serving draft beer on board.

#5 Spirit Airlines

Shutterstock/Carlos Yudica

Flying with Spirit Airlines is like going to a dive bar. There are no frills, the cost is incredibly low, the appearance is questionable, but it gets the job done. Since you have to pay for a carry on, pay to select your seat, and even pay for a boarding pass if you don’t print it at home, it should come as no surprise that food or drink of any kind are not included. Even if you want to cough up a few bucks that you no-doubt saved on your fare, there are no meals, and the snack selection is limited. Really, all you need to know is this statement, taken directly from Spirit’s website under the Onboard Snacks and Drinks section: “Save even more by bringing your own snacks for the flight.” Thanks, we will.

Speaking of dive bars, here’s our list of the 25 best in America.

#3 Aeroflot

One of the biggest complaints when it comes to Russian airline Aeroflot is the food. The biggest gripe? It probably shouldn’t even be called food in the first place. The taste is bland, the preparation often results in either undercooked or overcooked entrées, and the presentation is nonexistent. The individual meals basically look like a store-brand frozen meal that someone pulled out of a 50-year-old time capsule. Don’t believe us? Click here to see some of the sad culinary creations. If you didn’t click that link, we should tell you it doesn’t lead to site cataloging bad airline food — it leads to Aeroflot’s official website.

Click here for info on Aeroflot’s business class meals. But don’t get your hopes up.

#1 Air Koryo

Surprised to see a North Korean airline on this list? We didn’t think so. Interestingly, it isn’t the food amount that gets criticized by travelers, it’s the quality. Despite the ongoing famine in Kim Jong-un’s crappiest place on Earth, Koryo actually offers up quite the flight feast. However, the fare resembled something between a grade school cafeteria and a low-end fast food joint, and the airline was the only one in the world to receive a one-star rating from Skytrax. Their signature burger has been called “tasty” by some, but most others refer to it as “mystery meat.” On the plus side, there’s plenty of beer to help your forget the meal…and the fact that you’re traveling to North Korea.

Curious what people in North Korea eat (when they’re lucky)? Click here for the story.


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles


8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I'm trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren't as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you've never heard of. But the truth is, you don't have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you'll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you'll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

Here, I've identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn't banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents' forestomachs, an organ that humans don't have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was "reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen," and as far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You'll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles



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