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Osaka Restaurant Makes a Case for Buttered Sushi

Osaka Restaurant Makes a Case for Buttered Sushi



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Buttered eel is catching on in Japan

Buttered eel sushi is a big hit in Osaka.

Butter makes a lot of things better. One Japanese restaurant chain decided butter is so delicious it could even improve sushi, and it turns out they were right.

According to Rocket News 24, the Osaka-based Jinen restaurant chain started adding pats of butter to the the top of its eel sushi, and the dish has been a hit.

“I’ve been wanting to have this!” exclaimed Instagram user Yoshitch. “Grilled eel and butter sushi. Excellent!”

Each dish consists of traditional vinegared rice topped with a slice of grilled freshwater eel. That’s then crowned with a pat of butter held in place by a little strip of seaweed. The heat from the eel softens the butter just enough to make it creamy, and fans say it makes the sushi feel like it is melting in their mouths.

Butter and sushi seems like an odd pairing, but it is evidently catching on pretty well. It seems inevitable that it will branch out and start appearing on other sushi restaurant menus soon.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


You Have To Eat These Dishes in Osaka

Long-standing stereotypes about Kansai folks run as follows: Kyoto-ites spend their money on clothes Kobe people on shoes and Osakans blow all their cash on food.

The latter phrase, kuidaore, literally translated means “to eat until one falls over.” Though I lived in Kyoto for several years, in spirit, I think I identify more with the Osakans – they really know how to eat!

Osaka is home to numerous fine-dining establishments, and in this area can hold its own with neighbouring Kyoto in many respects. But where I think it truly shines is B-grade cuisine. “B-grade” doesn’t imply inferiority, but is simply a categorical counterpart to “A-grade cuisine.” The latter includes sushi and kaiseki, whereas B-grade cuisine is more like Japanese soul food. Think ramen, okonomiyaki, and curry rice. The American cultural analogue might be burgers or pizzas. B-grade cuisine is often greasy and high-calorie, hearty and inexpensive (though not necessarily so). It is always unpretentious, informal and delicious.

Here are a few dishes you have to try when you’re in Osaka.


Watch the video: Osaka Sushi Restaurant (August 2022).