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A Guide to Proper Wine Pronunciation (Slideshow)

A Guide to Proper Wine Pronunciation (Slideshow)


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December 18, 2013

By

Haley Willard

Let's be honest, everyone’s had an "Actually, its pino-gree-jo" moment

Brunello di Montalcino

(brew-nel-lo dee mahn-tahl-chee-no)

Cuvée

(coo-vay)

Entre-Deux-Mers

(ong-truh-de-merr)

Hermitage

(er-mee-tahj)

Gewürztraminer

(geh-viartz-trah-mee-ner)

Gigondas

(jhee-gohn-dahs)

Grüner Veltliner

(grew-ner velt-lee-ner)

Pauillac

(poy-yac)

Puligny-Montrachet

(poll-een-yee–mon-ra-shay)

Rias Baixas

(ree-ahs buy-shuss)

Sangiovese

(san-joe-vae-sae)

Sémillon

(say-meel-yohng)

Txakoli

(chock-oh-lee)

Valpolicella

(val-po-lee-CHEL-lah)

Vinho Verde

(VEEN-yo VAIRD)

Viognier

(vee-oh-nee-aye)


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.


Old-Fashioned Muscadine Wine

Muscadine grapes are native to the United States, but if you've never heard of them, it's because muscadine grapes aren't commercially farmed like other grapes, and their wine isn't as sought after as wine from other varieties. But these grapes are still cultivated in the South, mainly because they do well in warm, humid climates and because that's where they were originally found. The grapes range in color from green and bronze to deep purple, are larger than other grapes used for making wine, and have tougher skins and seeds. They mature in late summer and early fall and have worked their way into the culinary repertoire of the South in the form of jams, jellies, fruit butter, pies, juice, and especially wine.

Muscadine grapes yield both white and red wines, and they're famous as sweet wines because, in the past, a lot of sugar was added to resemble the flavors of other types of grapes. Now that processes are changing, the production of muscadine wine is shifting and giving birth to wonderful bottles of refreshing and medium-bodied wines that, although typically sweeter than other wines, are wonderful accompaniments for dessert or great as post-dinner caps. Muscadine wine has an average alcohol content of 10 percent ABV.

Our recipe for muscadine wine makes a sweet, old-fashioned wine. Since this recipe will strain the liquids from the solids, it's not necessary to remove the skin and seeds from the grapes before mashing them. The recipe calls for 1 quart of mashed grapes you'll need about 4 pounds of grapes to produce that amount. This kind of process can also be done with regular grapes or blackberries.