Latest recipes

‘The Art of the Cheese Plate’ With Cheese Expert Tia Keenan

‘The Art of the Cheese Plate’ With Cheese Expert Tia Keenan



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Tia Keenan’s newly released cookbook, The Art of the Cheese Plate: Pairings, Recipes, Style, Attitude, redefines what we think of upon hearing the words “cheese plate.”

Keenan, author, chef, and fromager extraordinaire (otherwise known as the “rock star” of the cheese world), presents 37 examples of distinct, single-serving cheese plates comprising 100 kinds of cheese, 111 pairings, and 84 accompaniments, all woven beautifully together with recipes, tasting notes, and beverage pairing suggestions.

“Single-serving plates of artfully paired compositions set a tone of deliberate exploratory enjoyment,” Keenan writes in her introduction. “They’re like a Saturday night‘going-out’ outfit — a sure sign you’re looking for a good time.”

Keenan shared six thoughtful accoutrement recipes with The Daily Meal to pair with specific cheeses: Do matcha marshmallows spark your interest? How about lotus root and carrot chips destined for a dip in a salty, creamy cheese like Époisses Berthaut? We also snagged remarkably beautiful recipes for Meyer Lemon Marmalade, Sunflower Seed Brittle, Basil & Preserved Lemon Pesto, and — wait for it — Ritz Cracker-Bacon Brickle.

What is most striking, however, is how simple it can all be — especially with a little help from your local cheese monger.

We were able to talk with Keenan to find out more about her inspiration and the mission of her book; check it out below:

The Daily Meal: What is your philosophy of pairing cheese and condiments?

Tia Keenan: Well, they should be balanced in terms of texture, weight, and flavors. They should punctuate the cheese or play up a latent characteristic. But I think the missing ingredient in so many pairings, and the thing that’s in mine that people subconsciously react to, is culture — whether it’s humor, history, nostalgia, whimsy. Food has to taste good, but it also has to mean something. When we connect to food on an emotional level it, in turn, tastes better. I’d venture to say that emotion is part of our taste perception.

How did it inspire the recipes you chose to include in this book?

Each cheese plate entry in the book has a theme; anything from country of origin, to milk type, to occasion for serving. And so within that framework I really played with the “culture” of each plate. For example, in the love-themed plate I used accompaniments that in one way or another are associated with love: apples, roses, a pepto-pink beet marshmallow. I thought through each entry in this way. Some are obvious, and some are more subtle — my hope is that overall and intuitively this will influence the experience of using the book. Not everything has to be hit-you-over-the-head obvious to make an impact.

What is your favorite recipe in the book and why?

I really love the Tequila-Braised Rhubarb — it’s so simple, and as a technique, braising fruit in booze is something everyone needs to add to their repertoire, with or without cheese. I’d love for people to move away from defaulting to fresh or dried fruits on their cheese plates and toward braised and roasted fruits, which are so lovely and can be flavored to pair with specific cheeses. That’s my “classy” answer. My super funhouse answer is the recipe for Cracklin’ Jack, which is basically a caramel corn with peanuts and pork cracklings. It’s demented.

How do you hope readers will use this book, and what do you hope they take away?

I wanted to make a book that was both practical and fantastical. So, on the one hand, this book is very usable: The cheeses are easily found, and the recipes are a snap to use. On the other hand, I wanted to disrupt the clichés of what cheese plates seem to always look like: that wood board/grapes/farmhouse table in the afternoon sun aesthetic. I wanted to show people images of cheese that were sexy, playful, fun, elegant, cheeky, so that I could say, “Hey, look! Cheese can be anything you want it to be.” Because in cheese, so in life.

Anything else you would like the share?

I have some pepperjack in my refrigerator, and I’m not ashamed to tell you that.

Click here to see featured recipes from 'The Art of the Cheese Plate’


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Tia Keenan Brings The Art Of The Cheese Plate To The Cocktail Hour

If you're in the mood for a cheese plate with your after-work drink, author Tia Keenan sees no reason to limit yourself to just wine." Cocktails have layers of complexity and intensity," says Keenan. "I love to pair them with hard cheeses, they need that power." In her new book, The Art Of The Cheese Plate, she pairs a Grana Padano Riserva (similar to a Parmigiano Reggiano and aged over 20 months) with a Gin Negroni and a Mimolette (with mustard and bell pepper notes) with a Cognac Sidecar. "Sometimes you need a stiff drink with your nibbles."

Keenan calls The Art Of The Cheese Plate a "doing book," as opposed to those taking an encyclopedic approach. She shows you how to make 37 different cheese plates, each comprised of three cheeses, along with simple recipes for accompaniments that, with a little preparation, can really elevate your cocktail party or dinner. "No matter where you live, you can replicate the recipes in this book," says Keenan. "This isn't just a book for people in New York or San Francisco. Most people are not buying their cheeses at specialty shops — they're buying them at supermarkets. Over the past decade, they have real cheese counters with a broad range available, and I based the book on what's available around the country."

After "falling in love with feeding people in the era of the foodie," Keenan saw an early opportunity to specialize in cheese and has been involved in programs at The Modern, at the Museum of Modern Art, Murray's Cheese and Lucy's Whey. "When people started demanding more cheese, my main talent was that I happened to be just a few steps ahead." And though she enjoys "precious cheeses from specialty makers," she's not above the common snack. "Last night my kid finally fell asleep, my husband was at work, and I sat down at my kitchen table and ate pub cheese with horseradish — I'm not ashamed."

And with election season in full swing, I asked Keenan which fromage best describes each presidential candidate. "Oh," she replied. "I don't want to insult cheese."

From The Art Of The Cheese Plate:

GRANA PADANO RISERVA

Notes of roasted game bird, tangerine zest, and hazelnut, with a creamy, hard, dry paste.

Grana Padano was first made by monks more than nine hundred years ago using a recipe similar to Parmigiano Reggiano. “Grana” refers to the grainy texture of this ancient cheese, and “Riserva” means it’s matured over twenty months. Grana Padano has abundant crystallization with deep, hearty, toasted hay flavors.

GIN NEGRONI

An aperitivo (from the Latin aperire, “to open”) prepares the stomach for eating— and it’s safe to say the Italians know a thing or two about eating. A perfect balance of bitter and sweet, the Negroni’s viscosity is handy when grappling with Grana Padano’s hard, dry, granular paste.

Combine 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, and 1 ounce sweet vermouth in a rocks glass with ice. Stir a couple of times and garnish with an orange peel.


Watch the video: How To Build The Ultimate Cheese Board Tasty (August 2022).