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Woman Charged with Poisoning Starbucks' Orange Juice

Woman Charged with Poisoning Starbucks' Orange Juice


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Don't trust the orange juice containers in the Starbucks display case

Today in "Oh my god, not going to drink or eat anything ever again" news, a woman in California was charged with attempted murder after two bottles of Starbucks' orange juice were found to contain rubbing alcohol. Sure makes you rethink that front refrigerated display case, huh?

CNN reports that Ramineh Behbehanian, 50, was arrested after another customer saw her pulling out two orange juice containers from her purse and adding them to the cold display case. The store then called in firefighters and police, evacuated the store, and pulled every bottle from the display case. The store also alerted neighboring stores to be on the lookout. The good news (if you can say that) is that police said they had no reason to believe that there were any further threats of tainted juices at Starbucks.

Police did say that the bottles looked like they had been opened, and not poisoned with a syringe — so do be looking at which bottle you're picking up.


Woman suspected of tainting OJ at Starbucks said to be trained chemist

A woman arrested after she allegedly tried to sneak tainted bottles of orange juice into a refrigerator at a Starbucks coffee shop in San Jose was a trained chemist, officials said.

A customer reported seeing the woman remove two bottles of orange juice from her purse and place them in a refrigerated display case at the store, the Mercury News reported.

When the customer alerted store staff the woman fled.

After examining the bottles and detecting what they described as a “toxic smell,” store employees called 911.

Police tracked 50-year-old Ramineh Behbehanian to her home about five miles away after a witness provided her license plate number. She was arrested on suspicion of felony poisoning.

Tests revealed she had mixed rubbing alcohol with the juice, police said. Investigators said they did not have a motive.

Authorities told the San Francisco Chronicle that she used a “lethal quantity” of the rubbing alcohol. The paper also reported she held graduate degrees in chemistry from Lehigh University.


Woman to be freed in Starbucks tainting

A chemist arrested on suspicion of putting a "lethal quantity" of rubbing alcohol in orange juice bottles and placing them in a display case at a Starbucks coffee shop in San Jose will be released pending the outcome of an investigation, authorities said Thursday.

Ramineh Behbehanian, 50, had been held without bail at Santa Clara County Jail on suspicion of attempted murder and poisoning.

Authorities planned to release her later Thursday because prosecutors did not charge her within the required two-day period for a suspect in custody.

Prosecutors are awaiting the results of lab tests before deciding whether to charge Behbehanian, said Sean Webby, media coordinator for District Attorney Jeff Rosen.

Behbehanian was arrested Monday after a customer at a Starbucks at 6009 Snell Ave. allegedly saw her swapping two bottles of orange juice in a refrigerator with two bottles she was carrying in a Starbucks bag, said police Sgt. Jason Dwyer and a company official.

When the customer brought the actions to employees' attention, Behbehanian fled, police said. Workers who examined the bottles noticed a "toxic smell to them," Dwyer said.

Firefighters concluded that the bottles contained a mixture of orange juice and isopropyl alcohol, or rubbing alcohol, police said.


California woman accused of tainting orange juice at Starbucks

SAN FRANCISCO &mdash A California woman faces attempted murder charges after police say she tried to sneak orange juice bottles spiked with a lethal amount of rubbing alcohol inside a Starbucks.

SAN FRANCISCO &mdash A California woman faces attempted murder charges after police say she tried to sneak orange juice bottles spiked with a lethal amount of rubbing alcohol inside a Starbucks.

San Jose Police arrested Ramineh Behbehanian, 50, late Monday. A customer reported seeing the woman take two bottles of orange juice from her bag and place them in an open-air refrigerated display case at a Starbucks in San Jose around 3:45 p.m., Sgt. Jason Dwyer said Tuesday.

When the customer told a store manager what he saw, Behbehanian fled. A store employee followed Behbehanian to the parking lot and jotted down her license plate number as she drove off. Other employees called 911 after noticing the bottles had a toxic smell, Dwyer said.

Firefighters on the scene tested the contents and determined that the bottles contained a &ldquolethal quantity&rdquo of isopropyl rubbing alcohol mixed with the juice, Dwyer said.

No one drank from the bottles, said Dwyer, who praised the customer&rsquos quick actions.

&ldquoThis person was heads-up enough and reported suspicious activity,&rdquo Dwyer said. &ldquoI think that person saved lives by doing that.&rdquo

Officers tracked down Behbehanian Monday night at her San Jose home located about five miles away from the store. She was placed into custody on suspicion of attempted murder and felony poisoning, Dwyer said.

Police are still looking for a motive.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot know if she has done this before or if she had plans to do this again,&rdquo Dwyer said. &ldquoWe have no reason to believe that there are other coffee shops with similar dangers.&rdquo

Dwyer declined to say how much rubbing alcohol was actually in the bottles, but he said it was sufficient for police to charge Behbehanian with attempted murder.

The Starbucks store in San Jose was closed after Monday&rsquos incident but reopened the next morning, Starbucks spokesman Zack Hutson said Tuesday.

&ldquoWe&rsquore immensely grateful to the vigilant customer who immediately did the right thing by notifying our store partners who immediately pulled the juice from the shelves and quickly notified the authorities,&rdquo Hutson said.

As a precaution, Hutson said that the Starbucks store in San Jose pulled all of its remaining juices from the open-air refrigerator and destroyed them. Other Starbucks nearby were also alerted and told to check all their juice bottles to make sure none of its seals were broken.

Behbehanian could make her first appearance in court as soon as Thursday, authorities said.


Starbucks Has Two More ‘Secret Drinks’ to Try

The list of drinks on Starbucks’ secret menu seems to be never ending—with the pink drink and the purple drink being some of the first summer favorites to pop up. But now, the latest to surface on the Internet are orange and green.

Though the orange drink has more of a yellow hue, our taste testers crowned it the best secret drink yet. Not to be confused with the Starbucks’ orange mango smoothie available on their regular menu, the orange drink is an iced mix of orange-mango juice, two scoops of vanilla bean powder, and coconut milk. There were no specific measurements available for the green drink, but it’s also an iced beverage and is made from black tea, matcha, and coconut milk.

The new Instagram-worthy creations help make up the entire rainbow. The only one Real Simple editors have yet to try is the blue drink, which has the same recipe as the purple drink sans blackberries (our favorite part of the purple drink!).

If you plan to order one of the drinks from the secret menu, make sure you come with a list of the ingredients—not all baristas are familiar with the recipes. Here’s what a few of our editors thought after putting the latest creations to the test:

The orange drink:

“This was pleasant—not too sweet. I liked it more than the purple and pink drinks. It was refreshing, but a little creamy.”

“The orange drink looks more like a yellow drink and smells like Sunny Delight.”

“This one was a little too thick for me—like a melted smoothie—but it didn’t have a bad lingering taste.”

The green drink:

“This basically just tasted like a watered-down matcha latte. It’s good, but it doesn’t really feel like a ‘secret’ drink to me. There’s nothing too inventive about it. All of their matcha drinks are green anyway—and taste the same—so why do we need a ‘green drink?’”

“This is my new favorite of the ‘secret’ Starbucks drinks—I love iced tea lattes, and the matcha gave it a little something extra. Very refreshing and not-too-sweet. I would drink this on a hot summer day, for sure.”

“Matcha is my go-to drink, so I liked it a lot, but I wished the matcha flavor was a little more pronounced. The other ingredients water it down a bit.”

“I was into it! Tastes like a drink I would get at an Asian coffee store like Mitsuwa. I would definitely order it if it had tapioca balls in it.”


San Jose pharmacist held for poisoning/attempted murder charges

SAN JOSE – 50-year-old Ramineh Behbehanian was arrested on April 29, 2013 for poisoning and attempted murder, she had tried to place two bottles of orange juice with lethal doses of rubbing alcohol in a refrigerator case at a local Starbucks. Authorities were called to 6009 Snell Avenue in San Jose where the female suspect had placed two toxic mixtures in the display case.

According to the police report, “a female was seen by another customer removing two bottles of orange juice from a bag that she was carrying and placing them in a cooler area with other refrigerated items.” The SJ Fire Department personnel tested the bottles and determined that they indeed contained, “lethal doses of rubbing alcohol. “

The suspect was reported to have then stood around to see if any one purchased the bottles from the case. In an interview, Sgt. Jason Dwyer with the San Jose Police Department said, “A customer actually saw this. They thought it was suspicious. Apparently our suspect overheard this conversation. She became startled and concerned she was probably going to be caught.” Behbehanian then fled the scene to avoid being captured.

Alert, Starbucks employees followed her to her car and were able to take her license plate number down, while others called authorities to report the incident. The suspect was soon apprehended by SJPD Officers several miles away at her home.

It was discovered that the two bottles had broken seals, all other orange juice containers in the display was destroyed as a precaution.

Behbehanian is a pharmacist for a pharmaceutical firm owned by Johnson and Johnson. The motive behind the poisoning and attempted murder of unsuspecting buyers of the orange juice is not known. Behbehanian refused to talk to authorities about why she had placed two lethal bottles of orange juice in the refrigerator case. It is not clear what led up to the incident, but authorities are reporting that Behbehanian was a victim of a crime in the past. A bond hearing has been set for Thursday regarding Behbehanian’s possible release.

Huffington Post: Ramineh Behbehanian Accused of Taniting Starbucks Orange Juice with Rubbing Alcohol


Terror attack in San Jose?

A disturbing story of a failed poisoning at a local Starbucks leaves us with many unanswered questions. It will be instructive to watch the follow-up reporting (or lack thereof) by the hyper politically correct MSM of the San Francisco Bay Area. This article appears to be a simple rehash of the police arrest report.

A woman was arrested Monday for allegedly trying to sneak bottles of orange juice tainted with rubbing alcohol into a display case at a Starbucks coffee shop in San Jose, police said.

Ramineh Behbehanian, 50, walked into the coffee shop on the 6000 block of Snell Avenue about 3:45 p.m. and was seen by a customer removing two bottles of orange juice from a bag and then placing them on a shelf with other refrigerated items, police said.

As the customer notified employees about the suspicious behavior, the suspect fled, authorities said.

Employees examined the bottles and noticed a "toxic smell to them," police said.

San Jose firefighters who responded determined the bottles contained a mixture of orange juice and isopropyl alcohol, or rubbing alcohol, police said.

Officers tracked down the suspect at 8:30 p.m. at her home on Chambertin Drive in San Jose with the help of a Starbucks employee who had jotted down her license plate number.

Police said they believe Behbehanian acted alone but her motive was unclear.

No one drank the juice, authorities said.

I'm making a special trip to my local Starbucks this morning, as a show of support.

Will the MSM and Homeland Security treat this as an isolated incident, or a failed attempt to attack a major US corporation and spread terror concerning our food supply? Or will this become another "dolphin story", where the information breaks the surface of our collective consciousness for a few seconds and then disappears, never to be heard from again?

A local TV station has reported that one of the orange juice containers was laced with isopropyl alcohol, the other with acetone, or nail polish remover. Both can cause very serious health issues if ingested.
Lee

A disturbing story of a failed poisoning at a local Starbucks leaves us with many unanswered questions. It will be instructive to watch the follow-up reporting (or lack thereof) by the hyper politically correct MSM of the San Francisco Bay Area. This article appears to be a simple rehash of the police arrest report.

A woman was arrested Monday for allegedly trying to sneak bottles of orange juice tainted with rubbing alcohol into a display case at a Starbucks coffee shop in San Jose, police said.

Ramineh Behbehanian, 50, walked into the coffee shop on the 6000 block of Snell Avenue about 3:45 p.m. and was seen by a customer removing two bottles of orange juice from a bag and then placing them on a shelf with other refrigerated items, police said.

As the customer notified employees about the suspicious behavior, the suspect fled, authorities said.

Employees examined the bottles and noticed a "toxic smell to them," police said.

San Jose firefighters who responded determined the bottles contained a mixture of orange juice and isopropyl alcohol, or rubbing alcohol, police said.

Officers tracked down the suspect at 8:30 p.m. at her home on Chambertin Drive in San Jose with the help of a Starbucks employee who had jotted down her license plate number.

Police said they believe Behbehanian acted alone but her motive was unclear.

No one drank the juice, authorities said.

I'm making a special trip to my local Starbucks this morning, as a show of support.

Will the MSM and Homeland Security treat this as an isolated incident, or a failed attempt to attack a major US corporation and spread terror concerning our food supply? Or will this become another "dolphin story", where the information breaks the surface of our collective consciousness for a few seconds and then disappears, never to be heard from again?

A local TV station has reported that one of the orange juice containers was laced with isopropyl alcohol, the other with acetone, or nail polish remover. Both can cause very serious health issues if ingested.
Lee


Calif. woman accused of tainting OJ at Starbucks

In this April 29, 2013 photo released by the San Jose Police Department is Ramineh Behbehanian, 50. Behbehanian is facing attempted murder charges after authorities say she tried to sneak orange juice bottles spiked with rubbing alcohol inside a Starbucks. San Jose police released additional details about the case on Tuesday. They say Behbehanian fled when a customer alerted store staff that she saw Behbehanian remove two bottles of orange juice from her bag and place them in a refrigerated display case on Monday. (AP Photo/San Jose Police Dept.)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- A California woman faces attempted murder charges after police say she tried to sneak orange juice bottles spiked with a lethal amount of rubbing alcohol inside a Starbucks.

San Jose Police arrested Ramineh Behbehanian, 50, late Monday. A customer reported seeing the woman take two bottles of orange juice from her bag and place them in an open-air refrigerated display case at a Starbucks in San Jose around 3:45 p.m., Sgt. Jason Dwyer said Tuesday.

When the customer told a store manager what he saw, Behbehanian fled. A store employee followed Behbehanian to the parking lot and jotted down her license plate number as she drove off. Other employees called 911 after noticing the bottles had a toxic smell, Dwyer said.

Firefighters on the scene tested the contents and determined that the bottles contained a "lethal quantity" of isopropyl rubbing alcohol mixed with the juice, Dwyer said.

No one drank from the bottles, said Dwyer, who praised the customer's quick actions.

"This person was heads-up enough and reported suspicious activity," Dwyer said. "I think that person saved lives by doing that."

Officers tracked down Behbehanian Monday night at her San Jose home located about five miles away from the store. She was placed into custody on suspicion of attempted murder and felony poisoning, Dwyer said.

Police are still looking for a motive.

"We don't know if she has done this before or if she had plans to do this again," Dwyer said. "We have no reason to believe that there are other coffee shops with similar dangers."

Dwyer declined to say how much rubbing alcohol was actually in the bottles, but he said it was sufficient for police to charge Behbehanian with attempted murder.

The Starbucks store in San Jose was closed after Monday's incident but reopened the next morning, Starbucks spokesman Zack Hutson said Tuesday.

"We're immensely grateful to the vigilant customer who immediately did the right thing by notifying our store partners who immediately pulled the juice from the shelves and quickly notified the authorities," Hutson said.

As a precaution, Hutson said that the Starbucks store in San Jose pulled all of its remaining juices from the open-air refrigerator and destroyed them. Other Starbucks nearby were also alerted and told to check all their juice bottles to make sure none of its seals were broken.

Behbehanian could make her first appearance in court as soon as Thursday, authorities said.

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(Bloomberg) -- Bitcoin whipsawed heading into the weekend after a fresh warning from Chinese officials over cracking down on cryptocurrencies.The largest digital currency fell as much as 10% in late Friday trading to as low as $33,550 before rebounding to as high as $38,133. The coin almost hit $30,000 earlier in the week, after ending May 14 at $49,100.The latest blow came when China’s State Council reiterated its call to curtail Bitcoin mining and trading. The crypto market was already rattled earlier in the week by forced selling and possible U.S. tax consequences.“You must always proceed cautiously with China -- never get too bullish or bearish,” said David Tawil, president of ProChain Capital. “We’ll have to see what the regulation brings. It’s one thing to say, it’s another to do.”The earlier selloff on Friday hit Bitcoin believers still fuming after onetime proponent Elon Musk did an about-face and criticized the token for its energy usage. Bitcoin is down about 24% since last Friday, though it’s up from a Wednesday plunge to as low as $30,000. Other coins have slumped too -- Ether is down about 38% over the past seven sessions.Aside from China, experts say cryptocurrency has become an asset that investors hold longer term. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers compared crypto to gold as a safe haven asset.“Crypto is here to stay, and probably here to stay as a kind of digital gold,” Summers said in an interview with David Westin on ”Bloomberg Wall Street Week.” “There’s a good prospect that crypto will be part of the system for quite a while to come.”Still, he doesn’t expect consumers to turn to Bitcoin for most of their payments, even though it could become an important part of e-commerce.The sour stretch with Bitcoin started with Musk suspending acceptance of Bitcoin payments at Tesla Inc. and trading barbs with boosters of the cryptocurrency on Twitter. China’s central bank added to the downdraft Tuesday with a statement warning against using virtual currencies. On Thursday, it emerged that the U.S. may require crypto transactions of $10,000 or more to be reported to tax authorities.China has long expressed displeasure with the anonymity provided by Bitcoin and other crypto tokens, and warned earlier that financial institutions weren’t allowed to accept it for payment. The country is home to a large concentration of the world’s crypto miners, who require massive amounts of power and thus run afoul of the nation’s efforts to curb greenhouse-gas emissions.“The new guidance issued from the regulatory agencies -- they’re taking it more seriously, they want more enforcement,” Bobby Lee, founder and chief executive officer of crypto storage provider Ballet, said in an interview Friday. “There’s talk about going after miners. The question is, can they catch all the miners?”China’s moves this week highlight the country’s continued desire to seek control over the notoriously volatile asset class. It’s something China would rather see regulated by the People’s Bank of China, market-watchers say.“It’s not really the mining issue that is the problem,” said Matt Maley, chief market strategist for Miller Tabak + Co. “They say they’re doing this as part of an effort to control risk-taking in their markets, but it’s really a signal that China is not going to be a big market for cryptos unless it’s a PBOC-controlled one.”In the meantime, volatility in Bitcoin is likely to stay elevated. The selloff Friday once again pushed Bitcoin below its average price over the past 200 days, which to some chartists and technical analysts suggests it could trend lower still to around $30,000, where it found support earlier this week.This week’s swings have led to huge liquidations by leveraged investors and damaged the narrative that cryptocurrencies will become more stable as the sector matures. Musk’s actions showed how just a few tweets can still upend the entire market. But even moreso, the past few days have renewed the regulatory threat on the crypto market.“Investors are underestimating the regulatory risk of crypto as governments defend their lucrative monopolies over currency,” said Jay Hatfield, chief executive officer of Infrastructure Capital Advisors in New York. In the U.S., the possible imposition of transaction reporting requirements could be the “tip of the iceberg” of potential Treasury rules on virtual currencies, he said.(Adds Summers’s comments in seventh paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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HUH?! Iranian Who Allegedly Poisoned Starbucks Juice Skates, Hires Lawyer to Threaten Schlussel into Silence

Now, I’ve heard everything. An Iranian woman who apparently attempted to poison Starbucks customers gets away with it, and her lawyer threatens me for writing about it. Yup, that’s what happens in America today. And, too often, people are scared away from the truth because of it. Because of empty, baseless threats by lawyers.


Ramineh Behbehanian & The Starbucks Jihad

Recently, I told you about Ramineh (also spelled “Romineh”) Behbehanian, an Iranian pharmacist, who ran off after replacing orange juice bottles at a San Jose Starbucks and after customers and employees who saw her do it, smelled rubbing alcohol and liquid acetone when they opened the bottles. After they called the police on her, Behbehanian was arrested on suspicion of attempted murder, because San Jose authorities detected lethal amounts of rubbing alcohol in the bottles.

Well, Behbehanian lucked out and skated. On Friday, San Jose authorities decided they would decline to charge Behbehanian because later tests could not determine the alcohol and because they felt they could not prove that she put apparent foreign substances in the bottles. Now, we are being told that the rubbing alcohol that customers and employees smelled and that San Jose authorities tested lethal dosages of in the bottles was “just vinegar.” Uh-huh. “Just vinegar” in orange juice bottles at Starbucks? Riiight. And why did Behbehanian replace the bottles (as customers saw her do)? We’ll never know “for sure,” but I think we have a pretty good idea why.


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The pair did not say a word during sentencing in the full courtroom.

Ms Sam was torn between the two men in her life.

She kept a diary detailing her predicament, professing her desire to be with her secret lover, and a plan to 'sleep in [his] arms'.

The diary provided police with crucial evidence in establishing the pair as a couple and providing a motive for the murder.

Justice Paul Coghlan noted the parties did not show any remorse for their actions.

He spoke of the 'excruciating' death that Mr Abraham was subjected to, whilst his wife kept her head firmly faced down.

Mr Kamalasanan, 36, was sentenced to 27 years, with a minimum period of 23

He went on to explain the grisly details of the crime and how it was enacted, which included an extensively thought out plan to avoid justice should the pair be caught.

Ms Sam also took the sleeping concoction that she fed her husband, and slept next to him whilst her lover crept through the garage to finish him off.

Mr Kamalasanan's guise was even sneakier it was claimed he 'attempted to fabricate a mental illness over three years' in an elaborate plan to plead mental illness and avoid the justice of the law should he ever be pinned for the murder.

While Justice Coghlan admitted there were no sureties in determining Ms Sam's exact role, he did say: 'your husband could not have been murdered without your knowledge or acquiescence.'

The court heard the murder plot had begun with Mr Kamalasanan, almost three years prior, and that he was the one who sealed the fate of Mr Abraham, by pouring the deadly cocktail down his throat


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